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Volumetrics Review - Does This Diet Really Work? Are prep time and food options deal breakers?

By Summer Banks on Aug 18, 2016
Volumetrics Review

We’re hearing a lot of buzz about Volumetrics. So, to see what all the fuss is about, we looked deeply into the side effects, ingredients, clinical research, and customer service. We also took hundreds of comments into consideration. We refined and condensed the information here to give you the info you need.

EDITOR'S TIP:

What is Volumetrics?

First off, Volumetrics is a diet plan that aims to help users lose a pound or two a week, without making any foods off limits. It’s based on energy density. For instance, a pound of carrots carries the same weight as an ounce of peanuts, in caloric terms. You’ll eat a lot of high density foods, like fruits and vegetables, so you can fill up without overdoing the calories.

Volumetrics was created in 2005 by nutritionist, Dr. Barbara Rolls. Dr. Rolls is a Professor of Nutrition and a Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior at Penn State University. We like that nothing is off limits and there is a focus on healthy foods, but read on…

Lengthy Meal Prep – “Be Prepared To Spend A Lot of Time In The Kitchen”

Our first concern is the amount of time you have to have ready to dedicate to meal preparation. “For many busy people, finding the time to cook the majority of your meals from scratch is hard. If you’re not experienced in the kitchen, you may be intimidated, and thus less likely to stick to the program,” said our Research Editor.

”There is still a lot of measuring and calorie counting,” said a reviewer.

”I need something simple and practical and that I will develop as a life style,” said another.

Not all dieters felt this way, however.

“I love cooking and being in the kitchen, so it wasn’t a big deal for me to make most of my meals,” said a reader.

“I stopped eating out so much that I actually started saving money,” claimed another.

Not for Picky Eaters – “Eat Lots of Soup and Produce”

While fruits and vegetables are good for you, picky eaters may have a hard time following the plan. Though you can eat anything you want, eating too many low density foods will leave you feeling hungry. If you don’t like a variety of fruits and vegetables, or enjoy soup, you’ll tire of the plan quickly.

”A book that tells you what you already know….eat your veggies and not the fried stuff and you can eat as much as you want without getting fat,” said a customer.

”None of the recipes were at all appealing..yuck. I eat all kinds of different vegetables etc….but there are 3 or 4 things I don’t like AT ALL and never eat or cook with,” a dieter explained.

Lots of people loved the food options.

“The fact that I don’t feel deprived and am enjoying eating more makes me want to send a thank you letter to the author,” said one follower.

“I have made a few of the recipes already and they really taste good,” shared another.

Over the years, we’ve found it takes a small thing, like having to invest a lot of time and energy into meals, to turn dieters away. They want quick, easy, and convenient, which Volumetrics doesn’t necessarily offer.

The Science – “Solid”

The plan is solid. Eat more healthy food and less unhealthy food, and you’re going to lose weight. This diet is credible because of the nutritionist who created it, but just because the science is there doesn’t make it a practical solution.

The Bottom Line – Does Volumetrics Work?

Should I run to the grocery store to get everything I need to start following Volumetrics? This is a plan with a relatively good foundation. However, we are hesitant to tell you to follow it word for word because you can do the same thing yourself without investing in the book.

If you’re ready to lose weight, we suggest turning to a supplement made with scientifically tested ingredients shown to support a healthy metabolism. To get the best results, use it with regular exercise and a reduced calorie diet, like Volumetrics.

Among the best products we’ve seen in 2016 is Leptigen. Its formula includes a unique blend of ingredients all tested for their ability to help you lose weight faster than diet and exercise alone. As we researched, we were unable to locate any negative comments or mentions of harmful side effects, which lets us know users are getting solid results. Plus, you don’t have to worry about meal prep.

And, right now, the makers are running a Special Trial Offer, which gives you a chance to try it.

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About the Author:

Summer Banks has researched over 5000 products in the past 10 years. She has years of nursing training, experience as a manager responsible for 15 supplement brands, and completed coursework on Food and Nutrition from Stanford University. full bio.

How Does Volumetrics Compare?

Previous Volumetrics Review (Updated January 6, 2012):

What You Should Know

Volumetrics is an eating plan that was conceived by the nutritionist Dr. Barbara Rolls. Dr. Barbara Rolls is a Professor of Nutrition and a Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior at Penn State University. In 2000 she co authored a book with Robert A Barnett entitled 'Volumetrics Weight Control Plan.' And in 2005 she published a book entitled, 'Volumetrics Eating Plan.'

Ingredients

There are no ingredients since Volumetrics is an eating plan.

Product Features

Dr. Barbara Rolls says that following a strict, severe diet, will only lead to unhappiness. You will feel constantly hungry and although you may lose weight you are likely to quickly put it back on again once you break your diet. Dr. Barbara Rolls says that if you want to loose weight successfully, you should follow the Volumetrics eating plan. Volumetrics consists of looking at the energy density of food. Energy density is the number of calories in a specific amount of food. Some foods such as fats, sweets and cakes have a high energy density. Water, for example, has a zero energy density. The system of Volumetrics therefore encourages you to eat foods that are high in water content and thus low in energy density, such as fruits and vegetables. Her book includes a number of eating plans and recipes based on her theory of Volumetrics. Fresh fruit salads, for example, and vegetable soups are perfect low energy foods and fit the Volumetrics eating plan.

Advantages

  • The books by Dr Rolls are reasonably priced.
  • Dr Barbara Rolls is an expert on nutrition and weight loss and has written over two hundred research papers on the subject.
  • The book, 'The Volumetrics Eating Plan' can be ordered online.

Disadvantages

  • Users of the Volumetrics diet may find that they frequently feel hungry.
  • There have been no long term standardized tests carried out involving the Volumetrics diet that we could find.
  • The Volumetric diet is actually very similar to other diets, since it basically involves increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables and decreasing your intake of fats.
  • Unlike a number of other diet plans, it is not designed to also increase your energy levels.

Conclusion

There is no doubt that Dr. Barbara Rolls is an expert in her field and that following the Volumetrics diet plan, you may actually lose some weight. However, the question we are concerned with is whether the Volumetrics diet plan is superior to other diet plans on the market. It seems that what Dr. Barbara Rolls is advising is in fact similar to other diet plans available; that is, to cut down on your fats and increase your intake of fruits and vegetables. The Volumetrics eating plan may help you lose weight, but we do not believe that it is superior to other diet plans on the market, nor that it will be any easier to follow if you've had difficulty sticking to diets in the past.

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